Jean Marc Fray, French Antiques & Decorative Arts
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Le Blog

News, views, reflections and musings about French Antiques, Art, Architecture, Culture, France, Italy, Austin (Texas) and a passion for good living.

Monday, February 15, 2016

The Art of Spring Brights | Interior Design Trends for 2016


As we continue our foray into interior design trends for 2016, the one major must have as we enter spring and summer seasons is lighting. Symbolic in a literal straight up sense, the warm and glow of light reflected on any surface sounds like perfection after this grueling winter season. Getting rid of of the winter blues aside, when it comes to designing the space of your dreams, lighting is the first powerhouse leap in creating the perfect space. Not only does solidifying your lighting game define the aesthetic qualities of a room, but it acts as an anchor laying down a foundation for the next stage.


 (photo courtesy of Vogue Russia)



(Click the Images Above for Direct Links 1) Murano "Cristallo Pura" Glass Chandelier by Salviati
 2) Stilnovo Style Murano Glass Globe and Brass Sputnik Chandelier)

 (photo courtesy of Palmer Weiss Interior Design)

 (photo courtesy of ABODE | Fern Santini Design)

( (photo courtesy of Jean-Louis Deniot)
 

 (photo courtesy of DiMore Studio) 

  (photo courtesy of Senato Hotel)


When starting out with lighting for spring keep in mind the basics. These four themes carry an equal weight of importance in regard to any interior and can make or break a beautiful room.





All of these questions back up why lighting is priority number one and sets the tone. Your process and journey start here for idea scouting and we highly recommend Murano be on of your contenders


 



(Click the Images Above for Direct Links 1) Italian Murano Glass and Chrome Sputnik Chandelier 2) Italian Murano Aquamarine Glass Chandelier by Barbini 3) Pair of Italian Murano Mercury Glass Globe Brass Sconces 4) Italian Art Deco Style Pair of Murano Glass & Brass Sconces 5) Italian Murano Textured Glass and Brass Wall Sconces) 



(photo courtesy of Vincent van Duysen)

 








Thursday, February 4, 2016

2016 Valentine's Day Gift Guide | Jean-Marc Fray Antiques

L'amour, there's nothing quite like it and February reigns supreme as the month of love. This month is also about that all encompassing symbol of love, the Valentine's gift. Cultivating that romantic magic can be tough 365 days a year, however, we have you covered for one of those days. This year, we've assembled a fool proof his and hers assortment to please even the pickiest of hearts or frost them with diamonds. From Charvet to Chanel and back with our favorite choices in our shop. Everything of course selected with love, from Jean-Marc Fray Antiques.


 




Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Chanel: Change through the Eye of Elegance


The ethos of Chanel, it always changes. Change after all is one of the overarching themes explored by Coco Chanel during her lifetime. The metamorphosis and evolution of Chanel is meant to mirror what a woman experiences in her life. Chanel is at once an ode to the woman and the legacy she left to women worldwide.  Change at Chanel is always rooted in elegance and a nod to the past in the present.

(The Evolution of an Icon / Young Chanel and Madame Chanel / Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


In different facets, change appears everywhere within the house of Chanel. It appears in the symbolism of the house colors: black, white, beige, gold, and red. It even appears throughout her majestically golden and chinoiserie laced Paris apartment.


 
( Courtesy of the house of Chanel)



(Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)



 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)



(Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


(Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)



(Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)












 (Click on pieces for direct links (not available on mobile) / 1) Antique Louis XVI Bronze & Crystal Chandelier 2) Murano Glass "Polvera d'Oro" Chandelier 3) Louis XVI Six Medallion Back Side Chairs 4) Art Deco Style Murano Glass & Brass Sconces 5) Murano Torsado Glass and Brass Wall Sconces 6) French Antique Louis XVI Carrara Mable Top Buffet by Chaleyssin



 (Click on piece for direct links (not available on mobile) / Sheaf of Wheat Table in the Style of Maison Bagues )


On a more surface level change also appears with Chanel muses. Every season from resort to fall, there it is again, a new muse to spearhead a new campaign.  While in France, Jean-Marc was lucky enough to find a rare piece, a lightbox advertisement for Coco perfume starring the very original Chanel muse, Inès de la Fressange from a now shuttered perfumerie. Shot by Paolo Roversi, this advertisement for Coco was the very last in a series that Roversi and de La Fressange created.

(click the piece above for a direct link)








Considered still to be one of the most chic and stylish women on planet, she was the first model to be signed to an exclusive contract with the house of Chanel. During the 1980s, Inès de la Fressange ruled the world of Chanel. Born of a French father with an aristocratic background and Argentine model mother, de la Fressange grew up in an 18th-century mill outside Paris. The ultimate at strength and innnovation, she has gone on to produce her own fashion line, perfume, collaborations with other companies, and published book sharing her Parisian style secrets. 



Launched in 1984, Coco was created by French perfumer Jacques Poige as a fragrance that would rival Yves Saint Laurent's Opium. If N. 5 was for day, Coco was the spirit of evening, filled with exotic Oriental notes and heavy with richness.

 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


After 1989, photographer and artist Jean-Paul Goude took over Coco advertisements with Vanessa Paradis, Karl Lagerfeld's new chanteuse muse. Following this iconic caged bird themed series, supermodel Shalom Harlow signed on as the face of Coco during the mid-90s.  The last two decades for Coco is a testament to how successful it is. Spun from the original are two flanking perfumes, a rarity for fragrance if ever.  Coco Mademoiselle and Coco Noir the two opposite extremes between a grand dame. That is Chanel for you, always changing. 







 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)

 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)


 (Courtesy of the Chanel Archives)



Tuesday, January 12, 2016

UNA NUOVA ROMA


You can feel the coming of an aesthetic change in the air. It’s a casual glance you notice of any time period, place, color, or an embrace of a long ago forgotten object.  Day by day it circles the world by internet, ship, plane, museum, auction house, collector, and designer. It starts to take shape and ripen, then you see traces of it everywhere. This cusp of explosion is where Neoclassicism currently nests.

Blame it on the rise of Italian fashion houses spreading the gospel of antiquity and Roman beauty for the last three years. It seems the world of interior design can’t resist this dip into the classics any longer either.


Photo Courtesy of Fendi & Valentino


Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray



Piazza d'Italia con Arianna by Giorgio Chirico / Photo Courtesy of the Gagosian Gallery 


Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray


Photo Courtesy of Valentino 


 Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray


Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray

Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray


This year, the house of Fendi marries architecture, interior design, and fashion in one push. The house moved their headquarters into one of Rome’s most beloved architectural monuments, the Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana. This masterpiece of travertine marble is pure perfection when viewed at all angles. Inspired by Neoclassicism the square structure is an ode to the colosseum created by Benito Mussolini as a symbolism of Fascism.

Originally meant to be showcased in the 1942 world exhibition, which was cancelled, it stands as a glimpse into what Italy and Rome might have visually become had the fascist regime not fallen.  An inscription at the top of the building is taken from a speech Benito Mussolini gave on the 2nd of October 1935, it reads, ”A nation of poets, of artists, of heroes, of saints, of thinkers, of scientists, of navigators, of migrants.” 


Photos Courtesy of the House of Fendi


Photo Courtesy of the House of Fendi

Photo Courtesy of the House of Fendi


Photos Courtesy of the House of Fendi


To commemorate the opening of the new headquarters, the House of Fendi has been hosting an exhibition since October entitled, "Una Nuova Roma" or a "A New Rome" to showcase the history of the building.  Works for art relating to the Palazzo della Civiltà Italiana from Gino Severini, Marci Sironi, Enrico Prampolini, Francesco Messina, and other artists will exhibited.  


 Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray

 
The new interdisciplinary aesthetic of  "Una Nuova Roma" or "New Rome" is based on delicate interplay between Roman antiquary and classical modernity. The results specifically in interior design and architecture are eternally moving and tender. The visual equivalent of blowing a kiss to the history of Italy.


Photo Courtesy of Elle Decor


 Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray


Photo Courtesy of Elle Decor


Photo Courtesy of Gucci


Though we revel in our exquisite French antiques, it's impossible to resist the romance of Italian antiques. In ode to "Una Nuova Roma", we've assembled incredible pieces to help structure the perfect indoor masterpiece. Perfectly stated in words of Augustus, “I found Rome built of bricks; I leave her clothed in marble."




Click Pieces Above for Direct Links, L-R 1) Murano Green Vase 2) Art Deco Set of Four Bridge Chairs 3) Antique Pair of Painted Wood Columns 4) Antique Bust of Hermes in Plaster


Photo Courtesy of Elle Decor



Click Pieces Above for Direct Links, L-R 1) Murano Glass & Brass Chandelier 2) Vintage Murano Glass & Brass Sconces 3) Colorful Murano Glass and Brass Picture Frame 4) Italian Art Deco Etruscan Horse Sculpture 5) Italian Modernist Console Table



Photo Courtesy of Elle Decor


 Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray


Photo Courtesy of Gucci


  Photo Courtesy of Jean-Noel Fray